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Boy Scouts Donate Popcorn to Local Troops

Created: March 03, 2020 10:40 PM

The Boy Scouts of America and the U.S. armed forces have had a shared bond for decades. This fall, the scouts held their annual popcorn sales and donating a large amount of popcorn to servicemen and women in the Northland.

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For more than a decade, when people buy popcorn for themselves, they can also opt to get some for the military. Northland troops decided to give that donated popcorn they sold to local national guard units. 

Scouts brought the popcorn to the Duluth Armory on Monday, and got see some of the guard's equipment too.

"They've gotten to take different tours of the facilities and see what the National Guard and the military does for us," said Clark Garthwait, District Director of Voyageurs Area Council. "We like supporting the families and the personnel, so it's a good way of giving back."

More than $12,000 worth of popcorn are going to units in Duluth and Superior. Popcorn will also go to troops in Hibbing, Grand Rapids, and Bemidji. 

The service members are happy to see the scouts making donations a priority, reflecting on how both groups give back to their communities.

"For us it just reminds us of what being a citizen soldier in the Minnesota National Guard ultimately is all about, " said Sergeant First Class Troy Smith. "We serve here, we live here, and if the community calls, we'll serve them as well."

SFC Smith says his unit plans to enjoy some of the snacks during upcoming missions this spring. They may also bring some to their major exercise in California later this summer.
 

Copyright 2020 WDIO-TV LLC, a Hubbard Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved

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